Tesla ‘a disproportional beneficiary’ of China’s incoming green tidal wave: Dan Ives

Tesla Model 3

Tesla is set to be “a disproportional beneficiary” of China’s growing adoption of electric vehicles and sustainable energy, according to Wedbush analyst and Tesla bull Dan Ives.

After navigating through a difficult few months in China, where Tesla combated unfair PR on several occasions that brought the safety of the company vehicles into question, Ives now believes that the automaker can now focus on expanding on its already solid foundation in the region. The Chinese market has been an exceptionally potent location for electric vehicle makers, becoming a main focus of several OEMs that are working to transition toward electrification. Tesla, while being a mainstay in China’s EV sales leaderboard for over a year, is primed to benefit from the market’s evergrowing love affair with the electric vehicle, continuing a monumental climb toward automotive legacy in the world’s largest car market.

Despite falsified reports of faulty braking systems on several occasions, Tesla has managed to be one of the best-selling EV manufacturers in China. In Q2, Tesla sold over 53,000 cars in China, capped off by an impressive 28,138 cars in the domestic market in June. The strong performance was fueled by demand for the Model 3 and Model Y, the two cars that Tesla manufactures in China at the Giga Shanghai production facility.



Although Tesla’s Q2 was a strong one, it wasn’t all sunshine and rainbows for the Silicon Valley-based electric car company. As previously mentioned, Tesla battled several claims of brake failures in its vehicles. The initial occurrence of this was at the Shanghai Auto Show, where the Tesla booth was infiltrated by a woman who claimed faulty brakes caused a dangerous accident. Tesla navigated through this scandal, along with several others by continuously debunking these claims. The company eventually set up a Special Handling Team to handle these issues, and also threatened legal action for those who were attempting to gain notoriety or money through false claims.

Ives acknowledges Tesla’s bumpy and tumultuous road in China in Q2, but the performance, which is indicated through the strong sales figures during the PR nightmare, essentially proves the company is ready to move on to even more robust sales figures. “We believe Tesla have navigated the safety/PR issues better than expected, and are now in a position to accelerate market share in this key region,” Ives wrote.

In May, Ives also wrote that Tesla, along with other manufacturers like NIO, Xpeng, and Li Auto, would all benefit from an increasing EV market share in China. Ives wrote in the May note that only 5% of total automotive sales in China were EVs and that the next two years would result in a doubling of this market concentration of electrified models.

In short, the benefits of a more supported EV market in China are going to fuel many automakers, but Tesla seems to be the one that Ives is putting his money on. This is mostly because of the fact that bad press really didn’t affect sales figures, and Tesla continues to perform in one of the most heavily concentrated EV markets globally.



Ives is ranked 43rd out of 7,591 analysts on TipRanks.com. He has a success rate of 74% and an average return of 35.3%.

News source

“If you liked the article, share it in ...”