Tesla to release “significant” Autopilot improvements to non-US owners by Mar 2022

Tesla FSD Beta

Tesla aims to release significant Autopilot improvements to vehicles outside the United States by March 2022. The timing for the release of Tesla’s Autopilot improvements seems fitting given Europe’s dedication to increasing road safety in the next few years through a series of regulations requiring the installment of vehicle safety systems in vehicles.

According to Whole Mars on Twitter, many Tesla Autopilot users in Europe have complained “about incorrect speed limits and not getting to the correct speed before you can cross the sign.” Musk responded to the tweet, saying that the Tesla Autopilot team aimed for significant improvements for owners outside the United States around March, based on regulatory approvals.




Countries in the European Union seem ripe for Tesla Autopilot improvements. A few EU regulatory bodies are developing mandatory vehicle safety system requirements for all cars sold and registered in EU member states.

In 2019, countries in the European Union agreed on the “general safety regulation,” a new vehicle safety law. The details of the agreements set requirements for various mandatory vehicle systems.

In January 2020, Regulation (EU) 2019/2144 started being enforced, making it mandatory to introduce a range of new technologies and safety measures to vehicles. The Regulation will become compulsory in all EU member states by July 6, 2022. The Federal Ministry for Digital and Transport (bmvi) laid out a detailed timetable for implementing the Regulation, as seen below.

Next year, Driver Drowsiness and Attention Warning Systems, Intelligent Speed Assistance, Advanced Emergency Braking, and Emergency Lane Keeping Assists will be mandatory. Then by 2024, every car sold in the EU must be fitted with the technologies mentioned above.



Tesla Autopilot seems like an excellent fit for the EU’s new car safety Regulation. The Regulation also offers Tesla a simpler, straightforward guide for getting regulatory approvals in parts of Europe, specifically countries in the EU. Trying to comply with regulations in each European nation might be more complex than following one set of rules for several countries.

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