Tesla starts testing its Full Self-Driving Beta software on Canadian roads

Tesla Autopilot

Tesla has started testing its Full Self-Driving Beta software on Canadian roads ahead of the wider release in the US.

Last weekend, Tesla started pushing its new Full Self-Driving (FSD) Beta v10 software update to its early access fleet.

Tesla FSD Beta enables Tesla vehicles to virtually drive themselves both on highways and city streets, but it is still considered a level 2 driver assist since it requires driver supervision at all times. The driver remains responsible for the vehicle, needs to keep their hands on the steering wheel, and be ready to take control.

The v10 software update has been touted as mind-blowing by CEO Elon Musk.



As we reported yesterday, the update shows some progress, but it still has some significant issues that make it less than mind-blowing.

Tesla has been focusing its FSD Beta testing in the US since it is where it is based, and it needs to start with some specific road rules, markings, and signs.

It is going to take a while for Tesla to adapt the software to other markets.

Canada has been expected to be the next market for Tesla to launch its Full Self-Driving Beta software since the rules, markings, and signs are closest to those found in the US.

Now Tesla appears to have started testing FSD Beta v10 in Canada.

A Tesla owner going by Joshua C on Youtube has posted a series of videos showing his vehicle run FSD Beta v10 over the last day:

Tesla has been expected to release the software in Canada to a select group of Tesla owners in the “early access program” to test the software ahead of a wider release.

In the US, FSD Beta has been in the early access program for almost a year now, and Musk said that Tesla is aiming to release it to the rest of the fleet by the end of the month.

However, a lot of the development made over the last year will apply to other markets, like Canada, where the wider release of the software shouldn’t be too far behind the US release.

Tesla will use data from its Canadian fleet to feed videos to its neural nets and learn how to interpret the different signs and road markings.

News source

“If you liked the article, share it in ...”