I rented an EV from Hertz. I’m not surprised they’re dumping 20,000 electric cars.

I rented an EV from Hertz. I’m not surprised they’re dumping 20,000 electric cars.

Hertz_car_rental_office_Livonia_Michigan-scaled

In my first few minutes inside a Hertz waiting room in Ann Arbor, Michigan, I quickly realized I wasn’t the first person here to try test-driving an EV through a rental service.

One of the men in front of me was asking the rep about his options — a Tesla, a Volvo, a Chevy. He wanted to know what set each car apart, what each one looked like, and what the pricing was for each.



When the worker went to the back to look for something, the man turned to someone nearby and explained that he really hated Elon Musk and didn’t want to rent a Tesla if he didn’t have to.

A conversation in the waiting room followed, with a spirited debate (well, as spirited as a bunch of polite Midwesterners get) about the pros and cons of Elon Musk and Tesla.

After that, it was my turn to pick up my Model 3. I thought the employee might find it amusing after all the Tesla talk in the waiting room — but he wasn’t phased. He must do tons of these a day, I figured.



The experience that followed reflected some of the headaches that may have led to Thursday’s decision by Hertz to sell off 20,000 EVs from its fleet, citing higher costs to service and repair

  • The first 24 hours in my rented Tesla Model 3 from Hertz were rough.
  • Once the battery was finally charged to 100%, things got easier.
  • I’d rent a Tesla from Hertz again, but I see w

In my first few minutes inside a Hertz waiting room in Ann Arbor, Michigan, I quickly realized I wasn’t the first person here to try test-driving an EV through a rental service.

One of the men in front of me was asking the rep about his options — a Tesla, a Volvo, a Chevy. He wanted to know what set each car apart, what each one looked like, and what the pricing was for each.

When the worker went to the back to look for something, the man turned to someone nearby and explained that he really hated Elon Musk and didn’t want to rent a Tesla if he didn’t have to.

A conversation in the waiting room followed, with a spirited debate (well, as spirited as a bunch of polite Midwesterners get) about the pros and cons of Elon Musk and Tesla.

After that, it was my turn to pick up my Model 3. I thought the employee might find it amusing after all the Tesla talk in the waiting room — but he wasn’t phased. He must do tons of these a day, I figured.

The experience that followed reflected some of the headaches that may have led to Thursday’s decision by Hertz to sell off 20,000 EVs from its fleet, citing higher costs to service and repair.

The physical credit card needed for my booking was on the other side of town. My fault for not reading the fine print and assuming I didn’t need the card if I had paid ahead of time, and also not a dealbreaker.

When I came back 40 minutes later with the credit card, it only took a few minutes to complete the transaction and have the Model 3 pulled around.



I was prepared to get a walk-around of the car or maybe some kind of quick run-down on how to use an EV or how to charge it. Instead, the Hertz rep handed me the Tesla key card and sat back down at his desk.

I sat there for a moment before turning around to see my Model 3 parked out front.

“Oh, there it is!,” I said. And I walked out to the car by myself.

Because I’d driven a Tesla before, I already knew how to tap the card to unlock the car and get in. I’m not sure a first-time Tesla driver would know that off the bat.

For what it’s worth, Hertz did email me some instructional videos about my Model 3 a few days before I picked up my rental. I found it buried in my inbox after I had the car, and these videos did help me quickly troubleshoot issues like adjusting my side-view mirrors.

My reservation quoted me about $56 per day — about what I expected for a fancier car during the holiday season. In total, my five days came out to $261.30 once taxes and fees were added in.

When I got in the car, instructions on the touchscreen told me to press the brake and tap the key card on the center console. Once my Model 3 was ready to drive, I immediately checked the range and my heart sank: Hertz had given the car to me with only 53% battery.

I knew in the Michigan cold that wasn’t going to last me very long. I needed to find somewhere to juice up before I could start putting the Tesla through its paces.

“Oh, well,” I thought, “A small setback.”

A Hertz spokesperson told me the company strives to have batteries at 80% for pickup, so it seems my experience was an oversight.

The second I pulled onto the road, cars kicking up salty water quickly dirtied up the massive windshield of the Model 3. I went to hit the wiper fluid and immediately got an error message on the touchscreen: “Wiper Fluid Low.”

Nothing came out of the sprayers. The wiper fluid wasn’t just low, it was empty.

“Ok,” I thought, getting a little more annoyed. “Add that to the list with charging.”

Between the delay getting my car and the lack of charge, I decided to scrap my errands for the day and head home. I had dinner plans that night and needed to get home and change.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest