Chevrolet ponders axing the Camaro for an all-electric sedan

Chevrolet Camaro (Credit: Chevrolet)

The Camaro has been one of Chevy’s worst-selling models in recent years and has been out-purchased by vehicles like the Corvette, which cost more and have a more premium appeal due to an increased luxurious build and feel along with more horsepower for the petrol-supporting drivers in the world. Due to this, GM might be considering calling it quits with the Camaro between 2023 and 2026, according to Automotive News, who reported that Chevy will keep gas-powered cars on its lots but may start consolidating its lineup of cars to make way for new models.

GM has plans to be fully electric by 2035. The company has already committed to building several new electric models, including the GMC Hummer EV that will hit the road in a few years. However, in order to make way for these new cars, Chevy must cut its losses with other models, especially ones that are struggling. Unfortunately for some, the Camaro may be at the top of the list. Chevy sold 22,226 units of the Camaro in Q3 2020, a 39.6% decline in sales compared to the same period a year prior. The Mustang from Ford doubled this figure in 2020’s third quarter.



Legacy automakers may be slowly beginning to realize that electrified versions of the namesakes that made them a relevant figure in the high-horsepower sector of the automotive industry will be needed in the coming years. One strategy that was used by Ford to immediately gain recognition of its first electric model was to adopt the Mustang into its EV lineup. While the Mustang Mach-E may pack some of the power and punch that its gas-powered predecessor did, it is not really a “Mustang” per se. The Mach-E is an all-electric crossover, large and wide in nature, and is more of a competitor to the Tesla Model Y than the Tesla Model S.

More information may be available in the coming months or years, especially as no concrete plans regarding the Camaro have been realized as of yet. Instead, GM will probably aim to develop more electric models that will utilize the Ultium battery architecture. The automaker is likely to decide what models will stay and go after its initial EVs hit the market.

News source

“If you liked the article, share it in ...”